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pierre
Webmaster

United Kingdom
13893 Posts

Posted - 27/05/2014 :  10:16:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Many thanks to Emyrs for sing in this fascinating bit of information and pictures.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________


Hello, I am a former resident of Tredegar. Although I left the town and emigrated to Canada town 59 years ago I still have a high regard for the town and still have many friends there, some from my early school days and others I met during my frequent visits. My parents, grandparents and other family members are buried in Cefn Golau, and my wife's parents, grandparents, and family members are buried in Dukestown cemetery. In time my ashes, together with those of my wife and daughter will be scattered in a place near Tredegar, (not near the Tump of Stones, the area chosen by Pierre) that we all loved and visited many, times in years past..

In the meantime I like to keep up with one of my many hobbies, (considered eccentric by some and bordering on morbid by others) of exploring cemeteries and graveyards. While I have read books and accounts that claim to report humorous epitaphs on gravestones I have yet to find any that are truly funny. I have found some dire prophecies on very old gravestones such as "In time you will follow me" and "now I am dust as you will be" etc.etc. and I have found some with inscriptions so terse or concise that they create curiosity in the reader. An example is the large monument in Cefn Golau originally erected in "loving memory" of Mr. William Charles, Ironmonger , The Circle, Tredegar, who was born in 1848 and died in 1902 but on a separate face of the memorial is noted, "Also of William Charles Finch Who Died June 5th 1954". Clearly these two gentlemen were the partners operating as "Charles & Finch" in the circle and the second inscription strongly suggests that both were buried in the same grave but many years apart (52 years). I find this a bit curious (although perhaps not illegal or frowned upon) to have two unrelated persons buried in the same grave. I believe I once saw reference to Mr. Charles's daughter also buried in the same grave as her father but that observation was a long time ago, before Mr. Finch died and I have nothing now at hand to support this.

William Charles/Finch



I remember Mr. Finch well in the years not long before he died. Every Sunday morning his old Renault car could be seen outside his shop in the circle and he would be inside trying desperately to update the shops inventory, an impossible task according to Lewis his assistant who cared for the shop after Mr. Finch's death. From what I gleaned from Lewis Mr. Finch had dedicated his life to the shop and had no outside interests or close family. To me then, if Lewis was correct, it seems a little sad that on a large obviously expensive monument Mr. Finch was only accorded a very brief notice, without any reference to having been " loved", just like an after thought to the effect he had died. I am aware that my reference to sadness may be misplaced and also that more inscriptions may have been added to the memorial since I saw it last. I also thought it a bit odd that on the large memorial recording their deaths Mr. Charles's full name formed the two Christian names of Mr. Finch

On my many visits to Tredegar I used to regularly visit my sister in Merthyr, always first checking out Vaynor churchyard to see if Robert Crawshay's grave had been disturbed. As many local residents will probably be aware, before his death Crawshay, an early Ironmaster, repented about the harsh way he had mistreated his employees, hence his fear of vandalism and so had directed that his coffin be wrapped in chains and his grave covered with a nine ton slab to prevent vandalism. On his tomb stone, apart from his name and date of birth and death, (1812--1879) will be found the simple inscription, "God Forgive Me".

Crawshay Grave




Returning to Tredegar I always took the old road from Merthyr and was always fascinated by the sight of the old abandoned church in Rhymney Bridge, and close to it a very large and healthy looking Monkey Puzzle tree. On several visits I failed to find access to the old church and was told more than once it had been completely isolated when the heads of the valley road was created.

Rhymney Bridge Church - 1988
/gallery/gallery/Miscellaneous_/Other_Local_Places_in_Wales/Rhymney_Bridge_1988.jpg



I didn't think this could have been allowed and eventually, after several enquiries found ( in 1992) a narrow entrance just about opposite to Parfitts garage. Near the entrance there was a bus stop but nowhere to park so I had to proceed through the narrow entrance and I recall passing a home on my right side. I believe I then proceeded under the heads of the valley road.The old church (I believe it was Welsh) was too far gone to permit much exploration but nearby I found the Monkey Puzzle tree and to my amazement, Wow,, it grew out of an iron fenced gravesite together with another large and clearly old tree. The second tree which I could not identify had gradually grown over the actual gravestone completely covering the description of the graves occupant. I would have thought a growing tree would have forced the gravestone aside but instead it had actually molded itself over and around the gravestone which suggests the latter must have been very well anchored. Having two mature trees growing in one grave is very unnatural, particularly as the Monkey Puzzle tree is not a native tree, it was introduced into Britain by a botanist, Archibald Menzies in 1795 and is native to Chile/Argentina, it doesn't produce fruit/seeds unless pollinated by another tree of the same species so one must assume that a Monkey Puzzle tree wherever found, must have been planted deliberately, in this particular situation either at the time of burial or shortly thereafter. That being so I can't help but wonder why. Certainly such a bizarre scene warrants a mention in my memoirs.









Chronologically I am well past my "best before" date and not likely to visit Tredegar again. I am however posting my experience in the hope that I might strike a chord with someone having a similar curiosity with cemeteries and graveyards etc, and who might be tempted after reading my post, to visit this old church which I believe had a predominantly Welsh congregation. In my opinion this trek would make a lovely Sunday morning walk,--on a sunny day of course, and if my situation was different I would love to make it personally. The undergrowth near the church in parts was near impassable but the grave containing the trees was close to the entrance path and easily found. A little further along the path I saw a fairly ornate (and clearly not many years old) a black gravestone bearing different dates, the last one for 1975. The balance of the graveyard was clearly abandoned and I can only believe this particular grave probably held long deceased family members with the last being interred in 1975.

If someone does make the trip to this churchyard or can make any comments on its history and /or the present condition of the grave containing the trees as noted I shall be very pleased to be advised of their findings. I have a fear that the new heads of the valley road way may have caused this churchyard to be more isolated or affected negatively in other ways.

Other bits'n'pieces to do with graveyards, gravestones, etc. The earlies gravestone I found near Tredegar was of a person buried on the 18th of December of 1658. Regrettably only half the stone is open to view and it is (or was) in the porch entry of the church in Cwmdu, near Crickhowell. The earliest gravestone I have found for an ancestor of mine was buried in 1701, and despite repeated searches in the graveyards of many towns and villages where my ancestors were known to have lived in various parts of England since 1596 I have found no other gravestones commemorating my ancestors earlier than those of my paternal parents. This fact evokes some sadness in me, not for the time spent on my abortive searches but for my predecessors who probably could not afford to create monuments dedicated to their loved ones.

The town where I live is located on the shores of Lake Ontario. We have three pioneer cemeteries in the area dedicated to early settlers, and one of which is situated right on the shores of the Lake itself. From this point in time It may have been sited too close to the lake because over the years much of the original shoreline has changed due to erosion caused by severe storms and much of the cemetery near the lake, together with human remains it contained have all been lost. It is well known that in the early days, prior to Lincoln's Emancipation Act, American slaves escaping to Canada, and particularly to Ontario, were well treated, given food, clothing and property etc. In respect to the cemetery adjacent to the lake however there is a legend that while black slaves were well accepted as equals in daily life they were distinguished in death by being buried in the rear of the cemetery. Then over time the front part of this particular cemetery containing mostly early white settler remains was lost to the lake and the ex slaves buried there were thus moved from the rear to the front of the cemetery.
When I first visited the Old Cholera cemetery near Cefn Golau in the 1930's it had a minimal type of fence. Consisting of horizontal metal tubes supported by iron posts it clearly had not been designed so much to keep intruders out as to delineate the perimeter of the consecrated ground available for burials, Soon after the start of the last war this fence was removed and used as scrap for the war effort. Strange why this metal fence would be taken when right up 'til long after the war there was much scrap iron lying around near the old number 9 pit ( abandoned in 1924 but left nearly intact 'til long after the war) and other old mine workings in the area.

I realize that the grave I found that contains two healthy trees although new to me, may be well known to others and possibly even documented somewhere. Also that others may have their own stories of odd findings, items of interest or anecdotes pertaining to cemeteries/graveyards and if so I shall appreciate comments on this topic.

Despite my expressed interests in cemeteries ( and of gravemarkers in general ) I do not want my passing to be recorded in such a permanent fashion. As advised above I and other family members close to me will be cremated and our ashes transported to the destination of our choice not far from Tredegar. I have over the years spent a small fortune on airfare and shipping fares, but our final trip (if my wishes are carried out as planned) we will travel fare free and I expect to be contained in someone's suitcase. If that fails I expect we will mailed via parcel post. No matter, the objective will be to end up in Wales. My wife and daughter were born in Wales and it really is their right to spend eternity there. I was not born in Wales but adopted the culture and spoke the language, not the real Welsh but the Valley language as described by Wyndam Scandrett, a well known and respected Tredegerite, ( teacher and later Justice of The Peace,) as "Wenglish" a mixture of English and Welsh.

I have attached photographs to support the above text, e.g. that of the Charles & Finch monument, the old church in Rhymney bridge, two tress in a grave, one of the Monkey puzzle tree in Dukestown cemetery which I have long admired ( I hope it has survived ) and lastly a photograph of Crawshay's grave in Vaynor near Pontsticil.

Monkey tree in Dukestown Cemetery



EMRYS.


_________________________________________
News & Information on Tredegar since 1991.
Visit the Tredegar Timeline Project at : www.TredegarTimeline.co.uk
Search on this website is your friend!

lewjon
Junior Member

6 Posts

Posted - 28/05/2014 :  13:25:07 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Emrys,how old is the church by Rhymney Bridge? Where was the Tredegar grave stone from 1658 orginally situated
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Gareth
Advanced Member

672 Posts

Posted - 28/05/2014 :  15:18:29 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is a magnificent post - well done Emrys.
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dutchjohn
Super Member

Netherlands
1363 Posts

Posted - 28/05/2014 :  17:50:25 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by pierre

Many thanks to Emyrs for sing in this fascinating bit of information and pictures.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________


Hello, I am a former resident of Tredegar. Although I left the town and emigrated to Canada town 59 years ago I still have a high regard for the town and still have many friends there, some from my early school days and others I met during my frequent visits. My parents, grandparents and other family members are buried in Cefn Golau, and my wife's parents, grandparents, and family members are buried in Dukestown cemetery. In time my ashes, together with those of my wife and daughter will be scattered in a place near Tredegar, (not near the Tump of Stones, the area chosen by Pierre) that we all loved and visited many, times in years past..

In the meantime I like to keep up with one of my many hobbies, (considered eccentric by some and bordering on morbid by others) of exploring cemeteries and graveyards. While I have read books and accounts that claim to report humorous epitaphs on gravestones I have yet to find any that are truly funny. I have found some dire prophecies on very old gravestones such as "In time you will follow me" and "now I am dust as you will be" etc.etc. and I have found some with inscriptions so terse or concise that they create curiosity in the reader. An example is the large monument in Cefn Golau originally erected in "loving memory" of Mr. William Charles, Ironmonger , The Circle, Tredegar, who was born in 1848 and died in 1902 but on a separate face of the memorial is noted, "Also of William Charles Finch Who Died June 5th 1954". Clearly these two gentlemen were the partners operating as "Charles & Finch" in the circle and the second inscription strongly suggests that both were buried in the same grave but many years apart (52 years). I find this a bit curious (although perhaps not illegal or frowned upon) to have two unrelated persons buried in the same grave. I believe I once saw reference to Mr. Charles's daughter also buried in the same grave as her father but that observation was a long time ago, before Mr. Finch died and I have nothing now at hand to support this.

William Charles/Finch



I remember Mr. Finch well in the years not long before he died. Every Sunday morning his old Renault car could be seen outside his shop in the circle and he would be inside trying desperately to update the shops inventory, an impossible task according to Lewis his assistant who cared for the shop after Mr. Finch's death. From what I gleaned from Lewis Mr. Finch had dedicated his life to the shop and had no outside interests or close family. To me then, if Lewis was correct, it seems a little sad that on a large obviously expensive monument Mr. Finch was only accorded a very brief notice, without any reference to having been " loved", just like an after thought to the effect he had died. I am aware that my reference to sadness may be misplaced and also that more inscriptions may have been added to the memorial since I saw it last. I also thought it a bit odd that on the large memorial recording their deaths Mr. Charles's full name formed the two Christian names of Mr. Finch

On my many visits to Tredegar I used to regularly visit my sister in Merthyr, always first checking out Vaynor churchyard to see if Robert Crawshay's grave had been disturbed. As many local residents will probably be aware, before his death Crawshay, an early Ironmaster, repented about the harsh way he had mistreated his employees, hence his fear of vandalism and so had directed that his coffin be wrapped in chains and his grave covered with a nine ton slab to prevent vandalism. On his tomb stone, apart from his name and date of birth and death, (1812--1879) will be found the simple inscription, "God Forgive Me".

Crawshay Grave




Returning to Tredegar I always took the old road from Merthyr and was always fascinated by the sight of the old abandoned church in Rhymney Bridge, and close to it a very large and healthy looking Monkey Puzzle tree. On several visits I failed to find access to the old church and was told more than once it had been completely isolated when the heads of the valley road was created.

Rhymney Bridge Church - 1988
/gallery/gallery/Miscellaneous_/Other_Local_Places_in_Wales/Rhymney_Bridge_1988.jpg



I didn't think this could have been allowed and eventually, after several enquiries found ( in 1992) a narrow entrance just about opposite to Parfitts garage. Near the entrance there was a bus stop but nowhere to park so I had to proceed through the narrow entrance and I recall passing a home on my right side. I believe I then proceeded under the heads of the valley road.The old church (I believe it was Welsh) was too far gone to permit much exploration but nearby I found the Monkey Puzzle tree and to my amazement, Wow,, it grew out of an iron fenced gravesite together with another large and clearly old tree. The second tree which I could not identify had gradually grown over the actual gravestone completely covering the description of the graves occupant. I would have thought a growing tree would have forced the gravestone aside but instead it had actually molded itself over and around the gravestone which suggests the latter must have been very well anchored. Having two mature trees growing in one grave is very unnatural, particularly as the Monkey Puzzle tree is not a native tree, it was introduced into Britain by a botanist, Archibald Menzies in 1795 and is native to Chile/Argentina, it doesn't produce fruit/seeds unless pollinated by another tree of the same species so one must assume that a Monkey Puzzle tree wherever found, must have been planted deliberately, in this particular situation either at the time of burial or shortly thereafter. That being so I can't help but wonder why. Certainly such a bizarre scene warrants a mention in my memoirs.









Chronologically I am well past my "best before" date and not likely to visit Tredegar again. I am however posting my experience in the hope that I might strike a chord with someone having a similar curiosity with cemeteries and graveyards etc, and who might be tempted after reading my post, to visit this old church which I believe had a predominantly Welsh congregation. In my opinion this trek would make a lovely Sunday morning walk,--on a sunny day of course, and if my situation was different I would love to make it personally. The undergrowth near the church in parts was near impassable but the grave containing the trees was close to the entrance path and easily found. A little further along the path I saw a fairly ornate (and clearly not many years old) a black gravestone bearing different dates, the last one for 1975. The balance of the graveyard was clearly abandoned and I can only believe this particular grave probably held long deceased family members with the last being interred in 1975.

If someone does make the trip to this churchyard or can make any comments on its history and /or the present condition of the grave containing the trees as noted I shall be very pleased to be advised of their findings. I have a fear that the new heads of the valley road way may have caused this churchyard to be more isolated or affected negatively in other ways.

Other bits'n'pieces to do with graveyards, gravestones, etc. The earlies gravestone I found near Tredegar was of a person buried on the 18th of December of 1658. Regrettably only half the stone is open to view and it is (or was) in the porch entry of the church in Cwmdu, near Crickhowell. The earliest gravestone I have found for an ancestor of mine was buried in 1701, and despite repeated searches in the graveyards of many towns and villages where my ancestors were known to have lived in various parts of England since 1596 I have found no other gravestones commemorating my ancestors earlier than those of my paternal parents. This fact evokes some sadness in me, not for the time spent on my abortive searches but for my predecessors who probably could not afford to create monuments dedicated to their loved ones.

The town where I live is located on the shores of Lake Ontario. We have three pioneer cemeteries in the area dedicated to early settlers, and one of which is situated right on the shores of the Lake itself. From this point in time It may have been sited too close to the lake because over the years much of the original shoreline has changed due to erosion caused by severe storms and much of the cemetery near the lake, together with human remains it contained have all been lost. It is well known that in the early days, prior to Lincoln's Emancipation Act, American slaves escaping to Canada, and particularly to Ontario, were well treated, given food, clothing and property etc. In respect to the cemetery adjacent to the lake however there is a legend that while black slaves were well accepted as equals in daily life they were distinguished in death by being buried in the rear of the cemetery. Then over time the front part of this particular cemetery containing mostly early white settler remains was lost to the lake and the ex slaves buried there were thus moved from the rear to the front of the cemetery.
When I first visited the Old Cholera cemetery near Cefn Golau in the 1930's it had a minimal type of fence. Consisting of horizontal metal tubes supported by iron posts it clearly had not been designed so much to keep intruders out as to delineate the perimeter of the consecrated ground available for burials, Soon after the start of the last war this fence was removed and used as scrap for the war effort. Strange why this metal fence would be taken when right up 'til long after the war there was much scrap iron lying around near the old number 9 pit ( abandoned in 1924 but left nearly intact 'til long after the war) and other old mine workings in the area.

I realize that the grave I found that contains two healthy trees although new to me, may be well known to others and possibly even documented somewhere. Also that others may have their own stories of odd findings, items of interest or anecdotes pertaining to cemeteries/graveyards and if so I shall appreciate comments on this topic.

Despite my expressed interests in cemeteries ( and of gravemarkers in general ) I do not want my passing to be recorded in such a permanent fashion. As advised above I and other family members close to me will be cremated and our ashes transported to the destination of our choice not far from Tredegar. I have over the years spent a small fortune on airfare and shipping fares, but our final trip (if my wishes are carried out as planned) we will travel fare free and I expect to be contained in someone's suitcase. If that fails I expect we will mailed via parcel post. No matter, the objective will be to end up in Wales. My wife and daughter were born in Wales and it really is their right to spend eternity there. I was not born in Wales but adopted the culture and spoke the language, not the real Welsh but the Valley language as described by Wyndam Scandrett, a well known and respected Tredegerite, ( teacher and later Justice of The Peace,) as "Wenglish" a mixture of English and Welsh.

I have attached photographs to support the above text, e.g. that of the Charles & Finch monument, the old church in Rhymney bridge, two tress in a grave, one of the Monkey puzzle tree in Dukestown cemetery which I have long admired ( I hope it has survived ) and lastly a photograph of Crawshay's grave in Vaynor near Pontsticil.

Monkey tree in Dukestown Cemetery



EMRYS.


_________________________________________
News & Information on Tredegar since 1991.
Visit the Tredegar Timeline Project at : www.TredegarTimeline.co.uk
Search on this website is your friend!



Hi Emrys,
I also thank you for your post, I found it neither morbid or eccentric
rather more realistic, after all we all end the same way ,from the day you are born the only true certainty is that we all die, end of ,

so your stories were very much enlightening I thought , and the one about the monkey tree, that must be a one off
regards
dutchjohn
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emrys
Advanced Member

715 Posts

Posted - 05/06/2014 :  20:51:52 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I don't know how old the abandoned church is in Rhymney Bridge and was hoping someone could tell me. The partial 1658 gravestone is in the porch of the church in Cwmdu, near Crickhowell. Despite many visits I never found the church open but the gravestone can be seen in the porch entrance. Emrys.
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pierre
Webmaster

United Kingdom
13893 Posts

Posted - 05/06/2014 :  22:38:48 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by emrys

I don't know how old the abandoned church is in Rhymney Bridge and was hoping someone could tell me. The partial 1658 gravestone is in the porch of the church in Cwmdu, near Crickhowell. Despite many visits I never found the church open but the gravestone can be seen in the porch entrance. Emrys.



Hello Emrys,

Unfortunately, it does appear that the church was turned into rubble a few years back. Please see view from google earth here. I plan to take a walk over next week to take photos.



Pierre



_________________________________________
News & Information on Tredegar since 1991.
Visit the Tredegar Timeline Project at : www.TredegarTimeline.co.uk
Search on this website is your friend!
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zx123
Full Member

82 Posts

Posted - 07/06/2014 :  00:07:04 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you for this fascinating information, it is always interesting to hear about the ways people lived in the past. As for the old Church I am disappointed but not surprised that it is gone, some people just do not value history and heritage of their local area. I think it is important to try to preserve as much of our history and heritage as we can.
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lewjon
Junior Member

6 Posts

Posted - 10/06/2014 :  11:06:31 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I wonder if the head stones have been preserved? Emrys does the 1658 stone say Tredegar or some part of the town?
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pierre
Webmaster

United Kingdom
13893 Posts

Posted - 10/06/2014 :  13:04:07 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Tredegar headstone from 1658 must be locating the Tredegar Estate in Newport maybe ?

_________________________________________
News & Information on Tredegar since 1991.
Visit the Tredegar Timeline Project at : www.TredegarTimeline.co.uk
Search on this website is your friend!
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fredd
Super Member

6216 Posts

Posted - 11/06/2014 :  00:21:09 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by pierre

The Tredegar headstone from 1658 must be locating the Tredegar Estate in Newport maybe ?

_________________________________________
News & Information on Tredegar since 1991.
Visit the Tredegar Timeline Project at : www.TredegarTimeline.co.uk
Search on this website is your friend!

"Other bits'n'pieces to do with graveyards, gravestones, etc. The earlies gravestone I found near Tredegar was of a person buried on the 18th of December of 1658. Regrettably only half the stone is open to view and it is (or was) in the porch entry of the church in Cwmdu, near Crickhowell. "
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pierre
Webmaster

United Kingdom
13893 Posts

Posted - 11/06/2014 :  11:25:16 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Many thanks to Emrys for the below info and picture:


I have attached a photo I took in 1984. it is of the tombstone/gravestone I found in the church porch in Cwmdu.The original (if it is still there) can be seen from outside of the church but inside the entrance way (which I have described as the porch). I could never find the church open to ask the reverend about the history of this item and the locals I spoke with were unaware of its origin except that it had been as long as anyone could reember.. I would expect it could be of a local V .I.P. possibly a member of the Glan Usk family or perhaps of one connected with the Tretower Manor House or castle both of which were/are close to Cwmdu..




_________________________________________
News & Information on Tredegar since 1991.
Visit the Tredegar Timeline Project at : www.TredegarTimeline.co.uk
Search on this website is your friend!
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rose bush
Advanced Member

United Kingdom
198 Posts

Posted - 13/06/2014 :  23:16:27 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Many thanks to Emyrs for this post, It was facinating to read, I`m coming to Wales next week for a few days and even tho the old chaple in Rhymney has been reduced to rubble I`m still going to check it out.Again thanks Emyrs for all the information,Jackiey.
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fredd
Super Member

6216 Posts

Posted - 13/06/2014 :  23:49:35 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Cemetery at Rhymney Bridge is known as / or Called, " The Graig " It's been privately Owned for Many years by Numerous different owners, Who Thought that they could build there, And Sold Fairly recently Again. That 1975 grave is Apparently The BIG Problem there for Developers.
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tomboy
Full Member

United Kingdom
19 Posts

Posted - 24/06/2014 :  02:03:01 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Emrys, very interesting reading i to have this fascination with graveyards and gravestone. I thought you would be pleased to Know that the Monkey Puzzle tree in Dukestown cemetery is still standing and it is the only way i can find my Great Grandparents resting place.
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emrys
Advanced Member

715 Posts

Posted - 24/06/2014 :  13:24:23 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you Tomboy. I have always admired that tree in Dukestown cemetery and am pleased to know that it survives in good condition. Emrys.
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fredd
Super Member

6216 Posts

Posted - 26/06/2014 :  12:48:12 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Quote From Emrys
I believe I once saw reference to Mr. Charles's daughter also buried in the same grave as her father but that observation was a long time ago, before Mr. Finch died and I have nothing now at hand to support this.

The Inscription Reads
Also Of

Mary Charles
Sister Of The Above
Who Died June The 3rd 1918
Aged 71 Years
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emrys
Advanced Member

715 Posts

Posted - 26/06/2014 :  15:39:19 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Fredd for that information. It seems entirely possible that Mr Finch and Mr Charles may have been bachelors. Emrys.
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