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 Photos and Video of Tredegar, Past and Present
 Commercial Street - 1950's
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keanjo
Super Member

United Kingdom
1401 Posts

Posted - 30/08/2015 :  03:58:43 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Billy Barber, London & General(?)Insurance, Red & White office
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ddraig
Super Member

United Kingdom
1736 Posts

Posted - 30/08/2015 :  07:47:04 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you! thats it, I was just dropping off to sleep last night and it came to me,(too late) They had two chemists at one time didn't they? One that's now Nelsons and the other was opposite the precinct, can't remember exactly where, I'm sure someone will know

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ShelleyW
Advanced Member

702 Posts

Posted - 30/08/2015 :  10:21:28 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The chemist was Wilcox one by luca's hairdressers and the other where Nelsons chemist is now !!
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emrys
Advanced Member

715 Posts

Posted - 30/08/2015 :  16:50:36 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The chemist opposite the precinct (at least until 1963) was Edgar Thomas. Emrys.
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Bryan Rendell
Super Member

United Kingdom
1788 Posts

Posted - 30/08/2015 :  18:17:20 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Before Ron Wilcox took over the Chemist at the top of Bridge Street it was Black's Chemist.

Before Ron Wilcox took over from Mr. Black he was the dispenser at Park Place Surgery
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brand
Junior Member

6 Posts

Posted - 31/08/2015 :  11:35:02 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
More businesses to recall 40's/50's

Rattigan - Butcher
Beavan - Butcher
Esdaille - Optician
Davies - Sweet shop (Castle St.)
Digby Watkins - Vets
Annie Bernstein - Ladies outfitter
Davies - Tobacconist (Morgan St.) Later solicitors
Alf Taylor -Barber (Castle St.) Later joined Claude Brooks and Billy
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pierre
Webmaster

United Kingdom
13919 Posts

Posted - 31/08/2015 :  16:05:53 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And some more (with thanks to Bryan)

Aneurin Morgans Shop

Where was this ?



SL Thomas



Sl Thomas Staff







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milkman
Super Member

United Kingdom
1674 Posts

Posted - 31/08/2015 :  16:29:12 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Aneurin Morgans shop was at the"end" of town between Thomas the chemist and Ah Fook Chinese Laundry (opp Longstaffs bazaar)
During WWII new bikes had no chrome and were painted entirely in black.
Mine cost £8/19/5 and so did my wife's so I think that was the standard price.
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keanjo
Super Member

United Kingdom
1401 Posts

Posted - 31/08/2015 :  19:12:25 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Milkman, £8/19/5 was three weeks wages for a collier and equivalent to over £500 in today's money! You were very fortunate children.
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hawkeye
Advanced Member

324 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2015 :  09:39:23 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As a boy I loved looking in S L Thomas' window at the bicycle accessories and loved the smell inside of the shop. Always bought my puncture repair kits there as well as brake blocks.
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Bosco
Full Member

United Kingdom
17 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2015 :  17:40:58 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Reading the many entries posted here really got me thinking. Anyone remember Sutton's in The Circle. It was a newsagents/fruit and veg shop. I used to but my comic's there on a Saturday, Bunty, Beezer and Dandy. There was always a red setter dog running loose in the shop. Then no one seems to have mentioned S & U in Castle Street. I also remember my mother getting her "perms" in Doreen Hayes in Commercial Street. I think there was a gift shop in the front of the shop, hairdressing carried out in the back. Also Geo Days. Remember going there to buy "loose butter" . I also remember a hairdressers in The Circle called Malcolm Shipmans. Think he took over that building from the Gas Board
Gosh really feeling my age here!

J. B. East
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milkman
Super Member

United Kingdom
1674 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2015 :  19:51:55 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
KeanJo- I didnt want the other readers knowing how hard-up we were.
We had a hlf-slice of bread witha scrape of dripping for two meals a day. (No breakfast since we had to stay in bed until we were less hungry)
Sometimes we could have a cup of tea but without water, just leaves.
Then only a quarter sheet of San Izal.
Made real men and women out of us.
(By the by I think the typical working man was on more than £3 a week- you must have been thinking of National Service)
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ike
Advanced Member

United Kingdom
245 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2015 :  21:03:05 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have a vague recollection of Lawrence's grocers shop and Evans the butchers at the end of town, next door to Chinese launders. Can any one enlighten me on this. I do remember Penny bazar, Camerman's greengrocers then funeral directors house and Haywards ironmongers.
The only hairdressers I remember, was Gomer Evans and Bill Williams in Castle Street.Bill Williams later became landlord of Rhydd Hall Pub, incidentaly having a wine shop in Llanbrach; Claude and Billy ? barbers The Circle.
Remember the British restaurant in the circle? Later to become Gas & Electricity show rooms. Great dinners there in the Forties.


128005
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keanjo
Super Member

United Kingdom
1401 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2015 :  23:13:28 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Milkman. The average collier's wage in 1938 was 10 shillings per 8 hour shift with about 4 shillings deductions which was less than the wages in 1920. There were various reasons for the low pay such as cheaper imported coal and as you know there had been a series of strikes in the 20s and 30s in an attempt to increase pay which had failed to bring any improvement . Things changed in the war years because the country needed home produced coal although miners still had to work long hours to get a decent wage. As for national service, that of course was nothing short of slave labour.I remember my first pay was 3/6d a day with 6d a day knocked off for barrack room damages. I tell you lad, times were so hard , we couldn't afford the dripping.
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ike
Advanced Member

United Kingdom
245 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2015 :  20:39:13 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The mention of Roberts the shoe shop; reminded me of what I was told by a man who once worked there as a boy in the early thirties.
He said that they had three shelves of working boots:
Top shelf dearest; middle shelf a little cheaper; Bottom shelf cheapest of all. Unknown to the customer they were all the same quality. Surprisingly the top and middle shelves out sold the cheapest!! True cost of the boots was the bottom shelf.
Psychology of snobbery.?

128005
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keanjo
Super Member

United Kingdom
1401 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2015 :  21:35:04 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I heard a similar tale from a pharmacist who bought asparin by the thousands and bottled them in 50s with red , blue and white labels . He priced them with red the dearest ,blue in the middle and white the cheapest .When asked the difference he told the customer that you get what you pay for. Most people chose the blue,a few chose the red but hardly anyone bought the White.what a way to earn a living!
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butch
Super Member

United Kingdom
2002 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2015 :  11:09:10 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Fake Britain, nothing seems to have changed,except that traders these days get gaoled for doing the same thing.
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milkman
Super Member

United Kingdom
1674 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2015 :  10:11:36 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
BUT it still happens- legitimately
Aspirin is amazingly cheap.
Aspro and other aspirin derived pills cost 4 or 5 times as much.
Many people choose the more expensive options.
(some even want them on prescription)
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Exbrompton
Advanced Member

United Kingdom
260 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2015 :  10:54:36 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Do you remember Hughes bike shop in Castle Street.They sold Hercules bikes.Morgans sold Raleigh
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smokey
Advanced Member

234 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2015 :  11:26:25 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
NO mention of the HORSESHE CAFE in Commerical St in the fithies
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emrys
Advanced Member

715 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2015 :  19:23:03 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Smokey. I don't think many will recall the HORSESHOE CAFE, once situated two doors south of the ROATH furniture shop. It was opened right after the war by two ex RAF officers. It had a horseshoe shaped bar but the paint colour throughout was, (in my opinion) hideous, very bright red in most parts mixed with jet black eleswhere.
The building had before the war had been used by a grocery store which I am sure was once occupied by PEGLERS. (please don't shoot if I am wrong). During the war it was occupied by a polish refugee, a Mr. Polocheck. He hired a lot of local schoolgirls ( I recall the names of two) to make imitation flowers. They produced large boxes of these imitation flowers and everyone wondered who needed them during war time but evidently mr. Poloceck had found a market for them.Emrys.
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smokey
Advanced Member

234 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2015 :  19:55:37 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Correct Emrys it was said to be designed as an American Cafe, I Delivered crates of milk there in early 1950
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harley
Full Member

31 Posts

Posted - 05/09/2015 :  12:08:55 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi does anyone remember the name of the cafe above the old bus station
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fredd
Super Member

6218 Posts

Posted - 05/09/2015 :  12:16:09 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by harley

Hi does anyone remember the name of the cafe above the old bus station

The "Roman Grill", and later it was called "Double Deckers" .
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ike
Advanced Member

United Kingdom
245 Posts

Posted - 05/09/2015 :  15:26:04 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Exbrompton, I do remember Hughes Castle street; my uncle Ivor & Auntie Maggie and cousins Jason & Joan lived there until 1948 sharing the business with brother and sister. They moved to Farm in Llangynidr retiring to Weston supermare early 60's.

Emrys I remember the Horse Shoe café 1948. Went there a few times ,but it lacked the atmosphere of the Italian cafes, returned to Bernie's top of Bridge street. Nicer hot chocolate and ice cream!!

128005
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