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 Photos and Video of Tredegar, Past and Present
 Miners at Pochin Pit Colliery
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Gareth
Advanced Member

665 Posts

Posted - 19/06/2016 :  18:14:53 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great Photo. Brings back memories of my childhood - seeing the colliers coming home just like the men in the picture - I so clearly remember those steel toecapped boots, the water "Jack" and the Box.
Coming home dirty and bathing in the tin bath in front of the fire. Also the Colliers trains with those funny looking ventilators on their roofs.
I lived with my grandparents at the time and remember my grandfather taking his clothes off in the coal cot for fear of bringing black pats into the house !.
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milkman
Super Member

United Kingdom
1605 Posts

Posted - 19/06/2016 :  21:23:57 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I believe the most common drink held in the Jack was cold tea.
I am sure others had Dads and will know what their father took
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Bryan Rendell
Super Member

United Kingdom
1787 Posts

Posted - 23/06/2016 :  14:15:47 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

The Miners train took the miners to work and every so often there was a halt - for miners to get off and go to work.

The train was a luxury as before that they had to walk to work. The 'knocker - Uppers' would tap the windows of the houses about 4 to 5 a.m. to wake up the occupants.

After WW1 a gentleman from Lydney - John Watts bought some ex- army lorries to take the miners to work. The lorry service developed into The Red and White Bus Company and later The Western Welsh.

In the early days of mining children as young as 6 or 7 were used in the mines to close the ventilation doors.

Many froze to death in the cold, wet dark atmosphere whilst others were caught in falls and burned by fire damp.

I've just been reading about conditions in the pits of the 1850.

Air-door boys. The air-door boy is generally from five to eleven years of age. His post in the mine is at the side of the air-door and his business is to open it for the haulier, with his horse and tram to pass and then to close the door after them. In some pits the situation of these poor things is distressing. With his solitary candle, cramped with cold and wet and not half fed, the pit child, deprived of light and air, passes his silent day, His or her wages are 6d. to 8d. per day. Surely one would suppose nothing but hard poverty could induce a parent so to sacrifice the physical and moral existence of his child! Yet I have found such to be the case, arising as greatly from the cupidity as from the poverty of parents.

No.46. Mary Davis, near 7 years old, air-door keeper. A very pretty little girl who was fast asleep under a piece of rock near the air-door below ground. Her lamp had gone put for want of oil and upon waking her, she said the rats or someone had run away with her bread and cheese so she went to sleep. The oversman, who was with me, thought she was not old enough, though he felt sure she had been below near 18 months.

No.131. William Richards, aged 12 years, coal-cutter. He works with his father. He has been at work ever since he was four years old. He went to school in Tredegar where the masters name was Thomas Griffith. He was taken to work by his father because times were poor and he was worth an extra dram of coal.

These children were carried to work and home on their father's back.

My grandfather worked in the pit at Farrington Gurney. He was caught in a fall aged 12 years of age and taken home to his grandmother who sewed his leg injury up with needle and cotton.

When he moved to Tredegar he worked at No. 9 Pit, in very bad conditions.
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MKerchey05
Super Member

955 Posts

Posted - 23/06/2016 :  14:40:12 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As usual, bryan, a great post. Todays children grumble when they are fed up or bored or don't have the latest electronic gaget. They ought to 'thank thier lucky stars' that they don't live in the 1850s! They'd really be 'hard done by' then!! It's a wonder that any child lived through that time.
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dutchjohn
Super Member

Netherlands
1363 Posts

Posted - 16/12/2016 :  19:17:25 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by pierre

I wonder what the average age was of miners in the area ?

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Hi Pierre
I think back in the day the average age would have been around the fourteen mark , I left school when I was 14 and went to work for the N.C.B. first to school in crumlin to learn about underground work , the gasses , seams of coal ,ect , and then i learned how to work on top of the pit at oakdale , before going to work in Pochin when I was 16 I started under ground doing all shifts except nights , not my favoutite job I must admit , put the wind up me ,long way down and a long way in , did it untill I was 18 and left and joined the army , never looked back , only been down one pit since and that was at the museum pit in bleanavon BIG PIT , took the family to see it from Holland , that photo above brings back memories of jam sandwiches in a metal box and water in what we used to call a jack
end of the workday we took a shower , and caught the red and white bus back to tredegar
regards
dutchjohn
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dutchjohn
Super Member

Netherlands
1363 Posts

Posted - 16/12/2016 :  19:34:05 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bryan Rendell


The Miners train took the miners to work and every so often there was a halt - for miners to get off and go to work.

The train was a luxury as before that they had to walk to work. The 'knocker - Uppers' would tap the windows of the houses about 4 to 5 a.m. to wake up the occupants.

After WW1 a gentleman from Lydney - John Watts bought some ex- army lorries to take the miners to work. The lorry service developed into The Red and White Bus Company and later The Western Welsh.

In the early days of mining children as young as 6 or 7 were used in the mines to close the ventilation doors.

Many froze to death in the cold, wet dark atmosphere whilst others were caught in falls and burned by fire damp.

I've just been reading about conditions in the pits of the 1850.

Air-door boys. The air-door boy is generally from five to eleven years of age. His post in the mine is at the side of the air-door and his business is to open it for the haulier, with his horse and tram to pass and then to close the door after them. In some pits the situation of these poor things is distressing. With his solitary candle, cramped with cold and wet and not half fed, the pit child, deprived of light and air, passes his silent day, His or her wages are 6d. to 8d. per day. Surely one would suppose nothing but hard poverty could induce a parent so to sacrifice the physical and moral existence of his child! Yet I have found such to be the case, arising as greatly from the cupidity as from the poverty of parents.

No.46. Mary Davis, near 7 years old, air-door keeper. A very pretty little girl who was fast asleep under a piece of rock near the air-door below ground. Her lamp had gone put for want of oil and upon waking her, she said the rats or someone had run away with her bread and cheese so she went to sleep. The oversman, who was with me, thought she was not old enough, though he felt sure she had been below near 18 months.

No.131. William Richards, aged 12 years, coal-cutter. He works with his father. He has been at work ever since he was four years old. He went to school in Tredegar where the masters name was Thomas Griffith. He was taken to work by his father because times were poor and he was worth an extra dram of coal.

These children were carried to work and home on their father's back.

My grandfather worked in the pit at Farrington Gurney. He was caught in a fall aged 12 years of age and taken home to his grandmother who sewed his leg injury up with needle and cotton.

When he moved to Tredegar he worked at No. 9 Pit, in very bad conditions.



Hi Bryan rendall,
as said by m. kerchey
as ussual a very interesting post , I haven,t been on this part of the forum before , so missed it compleatly the kids of today have got bugger all to complain about , I worked down the pit with nothing more than jam sandwiches and a jack of water , the work was hard and very often dangerous , and as for the pay , well it got you throught the week , but only just , no such thing as savings in those days , my first wage for six days in the early sixties was 6 pounds , thats about one and a half pints of ale today so I thinks the youth of today should spend more time looking for employment , or even creating some , they are not all dumb asses
dutchjohn
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monty
Full Member

United Kingdom
32 Posts

Posted - 12/01/2017 :  15:28:01 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi, I`m researching my family from Tredegar. My grandparents were Evan John and Louisa Edwards. They had 3 children, my dad Ronald, Muriel/Martha and Margaret. They lived at 6, Rose Bungalow 13k Queen St Tredegar in 1938. My dad Ron and his sister Muriel were put in the childrens home. My Granddad died in 1966 age 59. he was a miner, and I believe he was a boxer. Do anyone know anything about the family and where was Rose Bungalow, Queen St, Tredegar. Any info much appreciated.

k new
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smokey
Advanced Member

234 Posts

Posted - 12/01/2017 :  16:37:51 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes your Grandad was a known to have been a boxer, I was very friendly with the Son Brynley at the time they lived under the market then lived up Cefn Golau, as far as I know Bryn went away to live
smokey
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indarkistplumstead
Advanced Member

United Kingdom
328 Posts

Posted - 14/01/2017 :  18:25:54 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
hello bob, my grandparents used to live at no 62 Charles but back in 1919 they were at temple st,dad was born in 1922 and my aunt a couple years later. I always got the impression that grandma got the 'house' because she inherit it can you tell me a little more info on this or did your parents rent one of the small cottages at the back of number 62?.
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JulesDrup
Full Member

United Kingdom
13 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2021 :  11:16:57 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My grandfather Dai Davies died underground at Pochin in 1960. He was only in his early 60's and suffered from lung and heart disease because of the coal dust. Thank goodness times have changed.
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